Improving the Oral Health of Pregnant Women and Young Children: Opportunities for Policymakers

The foundation for good oral health is established early in childhood and the role of the mother is significant even prior to conception.1 Most women, however, are unaware of the potential consequences of neglecting their own oral health could have on them and their baby prior to, during, and after pregnancy. Although dental care during pregnancy is both safe and can prevent long term health problems for both mother and child, an overwhelming number of women do not seek dental care during pregnancy. This issue is compounded by the fact that many dentists are reluctant or refuse to see pregnant patients.

This issue brief, developed in collaboration with in collaboration with the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, March of Dimes, and the Washington Dental Service Foundation, explores efforts and policy options to move both patients and providers toward a better understanding of the importance and safety of oral health care prior to, during and after pregnancy (perinatal).

Download: Improving the Oral Health of Pregnant and Young Children:  Opportunities for Policymakers

Also available for download is Oral Health Care During Pregnancy: A National Consensus Statement. This document is intended to help professionals working in states and communities plan, develop, and implement programs to help ensure that pregnant women receive optimal oral health services and is available through the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center.

Comments (2)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Johng328 says:

    I’m extremely impressed with your writing skills and also with the layout on your weblog. Is this a paid theme or did you modify it yourself? Either way keep up the excellent quality writing, it is rare to see a great blog like this one nowadays.. edgdccgkkgfe

  2. Pregnancy is a time when there are a lot of changes in the hormonal balance in the pregnant mother, there are lots of physiological changes including increases in fluid and blood volume can result in dental caries & gum disease.

Leave a Reply




If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a Gravatar.